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tmtbradley trip report 2013 - Photos
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mtbradley
Link to this postPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 11:33 am    Post subject: Note tmtbradley trip report 2013 - Photos

Here's the link to our trip photos on flickr. The "Superset" is probably the best way to browse them. There is also a link to our videos on youtube. It's mostly underwater stuff shot with a go pro at The Baths, the Rhone, and The Indians. Enjoy!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bradleysix/collections/72157634135706221/
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walker
Link to this postPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 1:08 pm    

Cool. I thought I knew where you got stuck. I was right. That is a tempting road, for sure. The steep incline down at the beginning is a good warning of what is likely to follow. At the bottom, it goes soft quickly with nothing on the surface to give you a hint. I always get out and walk first. If it is solid enough, then I drive. There are times when that section is very dry and you can drive a long way in. It was that way back in the spring.

You are far from the only person that has needed a backhoe to get out of there. You got out pretty economically, too. People have paid as much as $500 to get pulled out of there.
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mtbradley
Link to this postPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 1:47 pm    

I wondered how common it is. When my crew member called Junie his first response was "Not my problem." But she asked him to help and he was quick to offer to send out a backhoe. He asked where we were and she told him we turned at a yellow house. He said he knew exactly where we were, and sure enough it wasn't long at all before help arrived.

In our photo sets is the GPS data (maybe that's what you were looking at) which shows exactly where we were.

By the way, the crew has already decided that we are definitely doing two nights on Anegada next year. And now that it's decided, I frankly can't understand why we've never done it.
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walker
Link to this postPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 3:24 pm    

That yellow house is the Faulkner house. The house was built in the 1970's by Clement and Gracita Faulkner after their original house on the property burned. Their daughter-in-law Gwen currently owns the house. Gwen is a nice friend of ours. She lives in New York City and comes to Anegada once or twice a year.

Here is an interesting article about Gracita.


Last edited by walker on Mon Jul 01, 2013 3:33 pm; edited 1 time in total
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kegoangoango
Link to this postPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 3:25 pm    

Nice photos. I particularly like the photos from the top of the mast. Very cool and unique.
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mtbradley
Link to this postPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 3:40 pm    

Thanks for the link, Walker! I passed that on to my crew.

Thanks, Keg, I've been going up the mast since I first skippered. That photo of the crew laying out on the trampoline is our traditional crew photo. I've tried different places. White Bay is probably the prettiest to look down on (Anegada was the most fun to look across from the mast - it's amazing how much you can see from 70 feet up).
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walker
Link to this postPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 4:10 pm    

Looks like this crew photo from the mast was at Sandy Cay.
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mtbradley
Link to this postPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2013 4:39 pm    

Yep. Second year in a row there. White Bay has gotten so bad we can't hardly get in there midday. For next year I'm thinking we get into White Bay early one morning to stake out a spot and just spend the day there. Though even then the crowds will come. We aren't much of a crew for crowds.

Here's one of my favorite pics from the islands, taken from the mast at White Bay:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/bradleysix/4758577938/
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Twanger
Link to this postPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 9:14 am    

Great photo!
One of our crew is bringing a GoPro to the SVI with us in a few weeks.
I'm hoping we can get some cool pics and vids.
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mtbradley
Link to this postPosted: Tue Jul 02, 2013 9:18 am    

Thanks Twanger!

Those gopros are great little cameras. In addition to the camera itself, I was using a waterproof housing and I had an extension pole that it was mounted on most of the time. I took an ipad as well and was able to view the video immediately afterward. There's also an ipad app (free) that the gopro will stream to live. Fun little toy.
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MrMBurz
Link to this postPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 12:16 pm    

Love the mast photos. I'd like to try that on our next trip. Any advice or tips you can offer so I don't kill myself?
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mtbradley
Link to this postPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 1:55 pm    

Sure! I use a repelling harness like they sell at REI with a locking carabiner. On your boat there should be a spare halyard with a snap shackle at the end. I lock into this snap shackle and crew members haul me up. I have them stop at the spreaders and put some slack in the line so I can take a break standing on the spreaders. Then they haul me up to just below the junction of the mast and the forestay. I put my back to the mast and put one foot behind the mast and the other behind a side stay to steady myself for the photos. Once finished I have them lower me slowly. You have to pay attention to how the riggers have run the halyard. There are also some obstacles on the way down that will cause serious discomfort if you don't move around them gingerly. Make sure the brake is engaged on the halyard at all times on the way up in case the crew drops the line. Make sure they have a few wraps around the winch on the way down. Whenever there are hand holds available, I use them in case something were to go wrong.

The only other thing is that I have often been nervous about the snap shackle. I know they are reliable, and it's never let me go yet. But it seems it would be all too easy to snag the ring on something and you're in free fall. That said, I've never used any safety to cover this possibility. If I were going to, I would tie a simple overhand loop into the halyard right above the shackle and put a second carabiner through this and attach to my harness. This would become my primary (taking the weight) and the snap shackle would actually become the secondary.

Now, for all that, it's really pretty simple. If you have any experience repelling or climbing, you'll take to it no problem.
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MrMBurz
Link to this postPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 2:18 pm    

Thanks for the detailed reply. Maybe I'll ask a rock climbing buddy for
a lesson or two ahead of time...just to be safer.
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Twanger
Link to this postPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 3:00 pm    

A locking carabiner is the ticket.

I used to rock climb, and we never trust our life to just a single carabiner unless it's of a locking type.

These are very common and available at just about any store that caters to climbers.

You could mail-order one from REI at http://www.rei.com/.

Here's what they call a locking D ... the gate mechanism can be locked by twisting the barrel on the gate to move up over the end of the 'biener at the top.

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walker
Link to this postPosted: Tue Jul 16, 2013 3:03 pm    

I never trust the snap shackle/halyard end when going up. I always tie my own knot. If it fails, it is my fault.

If available, I also always have a second halyard loosely following with wraps on a winch.
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