BVIPirate Forum Index
Click for Beef Island, British Virgin Islands Forecast
Search FAQ
Log in Register
BVI Weather
Recommended Anchorages
Goto page 1, 2  Next, All  
Jump to:  
Post new topic   Reply to topic    BVIPirate Forum Index -> British Virgin Islands -> Sailing and Navigation
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
HaftBaked
Link to this postPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 10:47 am    Post subject: Note Recommended Anchorages

Greetings,

In dealing with my DIF I am starting to play with possible itineraries for our next charter in Jan 2014. Yes 9 months away!! yikes Its going to be a long nine months!!

Last trip (and our first) we did a ball or a slip (VGYH) each night. We hit the Bight, Great Harbor (JVD), Marina Cay, VGYH, and Saba/BEYC.

I am not a hard core "stick to the itinerary guy" and am sure we will play it somewhat by ear with weather considerations thrown in. We know one thing we want to do for sure is get a slip at Leverick, probably for 2 nights, and rent a car to tour VG one day. We also are considering getting to Anegada pending approval from Brent at Capt. Compass, but we will see.

But I was looking at anchorages (non mooring ball fields) in my cruising guide and Virgin Anchorages and was wondering about some of these. Primarily looking for good overnight, realatively easy approaches and excellent holding type places. Looking mostly on the channel islands, Norman, Buck, Peter, Cooper, maybe Camanoe and Guana as well. But any other areas are open.

So any suggestions, recommendations, or favorites???

Thanks,
Rick
Back to top
Herve
Link to this postPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 12:06 pm    

The easiest one and also pretty spectacular is Lee bay on Camanoe...I also like Cam bay on the other side but it is red lined by charter companies.
Cooper is tricky due to wind and current interaction and would take a balll there. Deadman Bay on peter is great if the seas are calm otherwise it gets pretty rolly.
Mosquito point on Guana is also a possibility but we ususally go there for a lunch stop and snorkel.
If you have a cat you can anchor on the very west side of White bay (JVD). Once the day crowds are gone it is a beautiful anchorage.
Then there is Little Jost but I have not been there in a while so I 'll let other comment on it.
Back to top
HaftBaked
Link to this postPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 1:04 pm    

Thanks Herve.

Just FYI, we are on a mono and I know Capt. Compass does not allow white bay, Jost.
Back to top
DawnB
Link to this postPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 5:30 pm    

Brent also doesn't like you to anchor at Haulover Bay on Cooper - I hope to change his mind someday.... Smile

We have stayed at Buck Island several times, if you follow the line of buoys in towards Maya Cove and then veer 28 degrees true once you are just south of the first red, you should be in safe water. The moorings are not for public use, so anchor to the north of them as close in as you can - we usually get about 15' under the keel and drop into sand. Sometimes we have trouble getting a set, but keep at it and dive the anchor - it's worth it!

I love this anchorage as there is usually only one other boat around, and a cat, so it's not too close to us. The island is private, but we've never been bothered in the anchorage. We use it as a first night stop when leaving from Roadtown or when the winds/swell are good and we feel we might be too late to get a mooring at Cooper when leaving from Sea Cow Bay. Enjoy!

Lee Bay is great, but put out a second anchor if you think the winds might shift at all - being careful not to cross over anyone else's... it's a tight fit if more than 3 boats are all trying to anchor near the saddle of the island (best place).
Back to top
kentth
Link to this postPosted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 7:32 pm    

When you check out the boat, make sure your anchor winch is functioning properly. On our last charter, the anchor would go out, but the winch would not pick it back up. There was a part broken on the winch, that would not allow the chain to tail off into the locker and would release after it was almost up and dump the anchor again.

Took us almost two hours to get the anchor back up in 20 ft of water, we dumped entire locker of chain numerous times. Very frustrating, the manual winch was no help, ended up pulling it up hand over hand and feeding it back into the locker. Which was no fun to do.

So let the anchor out, set it and then pull it back in.

Kent
Back to top
sail2wind
Link to this postPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 12:52 pm    

2 hours? how much chain do you have?
Back to top
kentth
Link to this postPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 1:20 pm    

I believe it was over 200 ft, the problem was about the time we would get it hauled up, then it would slip back off of the winch there was no way to snub it off. The best way to explain it is, the catch that holds the chain so it will not trail back into the water was broken. Was that way when we took the boat out and I didn't catch it.

It was not a very big piece of metal, I actually found it laying in the bottom of the anchor locker. I can't remember how many times, my son and I hauled the anchor up hand over hand, and have it get away from us and then we would watch it and all the rode end up back in the water. I was sure glad it was tied off to the boat also and we had a lot of room to maneuver. If we had been in tight quarters, we would of had a real mess.

We finally pulled it in a little at a time, put a BFS in one of the links, so if would stop it if took off again. We were at Sandy Spit, called the charter company, but they could not get anybody to use for a few hours, to help us.

I was not happy since I consider having a working anchor, a vital part of a boat and a safety issue if you do not have one. It did workedm you either had it all the way up or all the way down, with the full length of the anchor rode on the bottom, anchor and all.

Kent
Back to top
DawnB
Link to this postPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:12 pm    

Kent, not to highjack this thread, but was there not a snubber that you could attach to the anchor chain? I would have tried to wrap the anchor chain around a cleat and then snubbed off whatever was "lax" chain, coil it into the locker, and then start all over again. That way, whatever you "snubbed" wouldn't have fallen back into the water.

Maybe I'm just not understanding, but if it was one of Brent's boats, he always had a snubber attached in the anchor locker as a backup to the winch on any of the boats I have been on, and we always used it to cleat the chain as a backup in case the winch failed.

Maybe I'm not even using the correct terminology, but hopefully you understand what I mean... Smile
Back to top
kentth
Link to this postPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:50 pm    

Dawn:

We tried a lot of things that day. Wrap the chain around the cleat, Snubber, the best alternative was the BFS thru a link. You would pull up the chain, have to hold the chain/anchor, especially when it got off of the seabed, while someone would unwrap the chain from the cleat after taking the pressure off of the chain between cleat and where it was being held. best way to do that was put a BFS thru a link, wedge it in place and let off the pressure. You could probably pull up about 3-4 ft at a time, then repeat process. The Snubber on this boat, which was a cat, was a yoke between the pontoons with a hook on it, so it was up parallel with the bow, the winch was back by the cabin. It really did not take much tension off of the rode.

Either way it was not a fun process. As I said, next boat we take out, we drop anchor and winch it back up and make sure it works, before getting to far from base.

Kent
Back to top
walker
Link to this postPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 5:16 pm    

I'm curious about what the "S" in "BFS" stands for.
Back to top
sail2wind
Link to this postPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 5:48 pm    

I'm also confused, you had a windless, why lay the chain on the gypsy, and why 200' for 15 ' of water, 75' would have been sufficient. I am assuming you are referring to a windless when you say anchor winch? Most windless have a hand crank, a bar inserted into the windless, making it a winch. 14 to one scope? Shocked
Back to top
DawnB
Link to this postPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 5:58 pm    

I'm more confused, I don't even know what BFS stands for... LOL

Evan, I don't think if the windlass broke (he said there was a part laying in the bottom of the locker and he couldn't manually winch it up either as it wasn't "winching"), but if the chain starts to let go, I am sure the whole thing would come out before I would put any of my body parts in the way to stop it.

I've had a chain jump off the windlass and dump pretty much the whole rode into the water, I imagine this is what happened to Kent?
Back to top
walker
Link to this postPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 6:08 pm    

What Dawn is describing is exactly what happens. When the chain starts to run, the weight of the chain pulls all of it overboard. A siphon. And it goes FAST.
Back to top
walker
Link to this postPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 6:11 pm    

Pretty sure I have the "BF" part. "S" = screwdriver?
Back to top
Twanger
Link to this postPosted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 7:49 pm    

Sounds like we've all had a chain jump off the windlass and pull itself all overboard.
It's happened to me a few times.

I'm always thinking... "Man, I hope they tied the end off in the bottom of the locker!"
Back to top
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    BVIPirate Forum Index -> British Virgin Islands -> Sailing and Navigation All times are CDT (GMT - 5 Hours)
Goto page 1, 2  Next, All
Page 1 of 2
 
Jump to:  

Terms of Use